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[luga] DES-II



Hi !

Gestern ist dass aufgekommen:


Subject: 
             RSA challenge solved in 39 days
        Date: 
             27 Feb 1998 04:20:32 GMT
       From: 
             ubchi2@aol.com (UBCHI2)
 Organization: 
             AOL http://www.aol.com
 Newsgroups: 
             sci.crypt




By Jim Kerstetter, PC Week Online

Breaking a 56-bit encryption key may be getting easier, but it's 
still no piece
of cake.

RSA Data Security Inc. said last night that a global team of 
programmers called
distributed.net broke a 56-bit Data Encryption Standard key in 39 
days, about
one-third of the time it took a similar team to break a DES key last 
year.

RSA offered a $10,000 reward (and a world of cachet) to the first 
group to
break the key as part of its DES Challenge II, announced at the 
Redwood City,
Calif., company's annual conference early last month. The company 
last year
launched its first challenge to prove that 56-bit encryption is not 
strong
enough to protect information on the Internet. This year, RSA sought 
to
reinforce that point.

Current federal laws allow unfettered export only of products that 
use up to
40-bit encryption. Companies can export 56-bit encryption if they 
promise to
build key-recovery capabilities - which give the government a 
backdoor to
encrypted documents - into their applications.

Some cryptographers argue that with little more than $100,000 worth of
specialized hardware, a savvy hacker could break a 56-bit key in a 
matter of
hours. So far, there has been no public evidence of that being 
accomplished.

The distributed.net team employed the same type of brute force that 
was used to
break DES in the first challenge, utilizing the idle time of the 
computers of
22,000 participants throughout the world and linking more than 50,000 
CPUs to
plow through the 72 quadrillion possible key combinations.

But the team didn't have to go quite that far. It searched through 61
quadrillion, 254 trillion keys at a peak rate of 26 trillion keys per 
second -
about 85 percent of the total - before breaking the message with a 
U.S.-based
machine powered by an Alpha CPU.

The decrypted message: "Many hands make light work."

Ciao,
	Bernd

--
 Bernd Petrovitsch                  Institute of Computer Technology
 Gußhausstraße 25-29, A-1040 Vienna    Email: bernd@ict.tuwien.ac.at
 "...Unix, MS-DOS, and Windows NT (also known as the Good, the Bad, 
 and the Ugly)."                                     (By Matt Welsh)
 UNIX is user-friendly ... it's just selective about who its friends
 are !!                                 2 is the oddest prime number


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